By Richard Bammer (The Reporter).

The first two years of PSAT-related results, released Tuesday, show an increase in student performance across nearly all racial and ethnic groups and grade levels.

Between the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years, average math and reading and writing scores increased, and a greater percentage of students were on track for college and career readiness, according to officials at the College Board, who announced the results.

The SAT “suite of assessments,” as they are called — including the new SAT, PSAT/NMSQT®, PSAT™ 10, and PSAT™ 8/9 — was first administered during the 2015-16 school year. The four tests measure what students are learning in class that is important for them to know to be ready for college-level courses.The number of students taking advantage of the suite continues to rise, noted officials at the College Board, a nonprofit membership association of more than 6,000 schools, which administers the tests.

More than 7.3 million test takers completed the SAT or a PSAT-related assessment in the 2016-17 school year, an increase of nearly 10 percent since last year.

The class of 2017 is the largest group in SAT history. More than 1.8 million students took the old or new SAT at least once during high school; 1.7 million, or 93 percent, have taken the new SAT.

By far, most of those students attend or attended schools in California, where state schools chief Tom Torlakson, also Tuesday, noted more students are demonstrating their readiness for college by taking the SAT and Advanced Placement® (AP) tests. According to the latest figures, the number of California high school students taking college-level AP tests went from about 300,000 to nearly 370,000 from 2013 to 2017.

Participation in AP tests increased across nearly all segments of California’s diverse student body during that period. The number of Latino students taking the tests went up 6.5 percent, and for black students an increase of about 3 percent, he wrote in a press release.

The number of graduates who scored at least a 3 out of 5 on an AP exam during high school — a result that may qualify for college credits — increased from 185,000 to 226,000 from 2013 to 2017. Some demographic group results also increased. The number of Latino students reaching a 3 or above grew from 54,000 to 82,500.

In California, 52 percent of 2017 high school graduates took the SAT, higher than the national average, 46 percent.

For the class of 2017, 46 percent of students who took the new SAT met or exceeded the new college and career-readiness benchmarks, showing they are likely ready to take and succeed in entry-level college courses. The mean total score for students in the class of 2017 who took the new SAT was 1060. The mean score for the reading and writing was 533; and the mean score for math was 527.

For more information about the College Board’s SAT suite results, visit www.collegeboard.org/program-results.

Nationwide, nearly 4.3 million students took the PSAT/NMSQT or PSAT 10 in the 2016-17 school year, an increase of more than 46,000 students compared to 2015-16.

A record 1.3 million students took the PSAT 8/9 in 2016-17, an increase of more than 417,000 students, or 47 percent, compared to 2015-16.

Between the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years, mean scores on PSAT-related assessments increased across all grades and nearly all demographics. For example, mean total scores for 11th graders who took the PSAT/NMSQT or PSAT 10 increased from 1009 in 2015-16 to 1018 in 2016-17.

By race/ethnicity, the mean score increases:

• For Asian students, from 1130 to 1148.

• For black students, 885 to 894.

• For Hispanic/Latino students, 925 to 932.

• For white students, 1064 to 1075.

“It is both rare and encouraging to see this kind of positive improvement across the board,” Cyndie Schmeiser, senior advisor to the president of the College Board, said in a press release. “I’m inspired by the swift embrace of the PSAT-related assessments, and even more by the progress we are seeing.”

In addition, more students who were “off track” when they took one assessment in the SAT suite are getting on track for college readiness when they take a second assessment as they progress through high school. For example, of students who took the PSAT/NMSQT as 11th graders and then took the new SAT, 12 percent who were initially off track got on track for college readiness by the time they took the SAT.

“Many more students from all backgrounds are taking advantage of the opportunities these assessments provide,” said David Coleman, president and CEO of the College Board. “With free, personalized practice and the ability to track their own progress throughout high school, these tests empower students to own their future and prepare for success in college and careers.”

He attributed the latest encouraging developments, in part, to “SAT School Day” for all schools.

SAT School Day allows juniors and seniors to take the SAT in their own school, during the school day. This program gives more students the chance to show colleges they’re ready. When students have the chance to take the SAT at their own school, they’re more likely to take the test and go on to college.

Beginning in December, SAT School Day will be available to all schools, regardless of their size.

“Now, even students from the most isolated rural communities to the suburbs, and students from small schools, independent schools, and religious schools can access the benefits of the SAT on a school day, which could propel them into college,” Jane Dapkus, a College Board vice president, said in the prepared statement. “One day — a school day — can make a world of difference for a student.”  Go to the article

https://i2.wp.com/testprepprofessionals.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/PSAT-Book.jpg?fit=480%2C360&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/testprepprofessionals.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/PSAT-Book.jpg?resize=135%2C135&ssl=1Kevin OrganisciakSAT, ACT & High School NewsACT,ethnic groups,grades,SAT,scoresBy Richard Bammer (The Reporter). The first two years of PSAT-related results, released Tuesday, show an increase in student performance across nearly all racial and ethnic groups and grade levels. Between the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years, average math and reading and writing scores increased, and a greater percentage of students...Business Guidance for Tutors, Test Prep Instructors, and Admissions Counselors