By Liz Moore (NYTimes) |  For the first time this Tuesday, the 70-member junior class of Chisholm High School in Enid, Okla., will sit for the SAT college entrance exam, but almost all the students will be clicking through Chromebooks instead of blackening bubbles with a No. 2 pencil.

One hundred fifteen miles east of Enid, the Tulsa, Okla., schools were also invited this year to administer an online version of the SAT, the exam that Tulsa’s 1,700 juniors must take. The district chose paper and pencil.

Like Chisholm, Tulsa already gives all its end-of-year tests online. But this is the first year that SAT scores must be reported to the state for Oklahoma’s school accountability report cards, and principals just did not want to risk an internet problem or power outage, explained Erin Lester, director of assessment. There are other challenges for this urban district, too, like how to give an online test to those likely to be in jail, juvenile detention or a mental health facility, a number that could range from dozens to more than 100 on testing day.  Read the full article

Kevin OrganisciakSAT, ACT & High School NewsBy Liz Moore (NYTimes) |  For the first time this Tuesday, the 70-member junior class of Chisholm High School in Enid, Okla., will sit for the SAT college entrance exam, but almost all the students will be clicking through Chromebooks instead of blackening bubbles with a No. 2 pencil. One...Business Guidance for Tutors, Test Prep Instructors, and Admissions Counselors